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TexMoot:
The First Annual North Texas
Literature & Language Symposium

13 January 2018
Scarborough College, Fort Worth, Texas

Keynote Speaker:
Dr. Corey Olsen, Signum University

Signum University is pleased to announce the first annual North Texas Literature & Language Symposium (aka “TexMoot”) on January 13, 2018, at Scarborough College in Fort Worth, Texas. This one-day event will include flash-paper sessions, a panel of invited guests, a keynote address by The Tolkien Professor, creative presentations, and lots of time for fellowship (open mic, games, and of course conversation!).  Registration is $30.00 and includes lunch.  The cost for undergrads is $25.00.  

You can register for TexMoot at https://www.regonline.com/texmoot2018.

Announcements

Book Launch Party for “The Inklings and King Arthur”!

We are happy to announce that The Inklings and King Arthur is scheduled for publication on January 1st, 2018, and TexMoot has the honor of hosting the book release party! This celebration will take place between noon and 1:30, during lunch. Dr. Corey Olsen will introduce this new collection of scholarship. The editor, Sørina Higgins, and the cover …

Introducing Dr. Olsen

The fourth guest on our scholarly panel will also be our keynote speaker; stay tuned for information about his keynote address soon! Dr. Corey Olsen will bring a literary perspective to our panel about literature and language in healing and refreshment of the spirit. Dr. Corey Olsen is the President of Signum University. In addition to …

About

Signum University sponsors regional gatherings throughout the year. These are times of academic conversation and fellowship that often include creative presentations and special guests. Although these conferences may vary in flavor, they are united by a love of stories and the people who read them.

A “moot” refers to a meeting or legislative assembly, but also the place in which that meeting is held. It’s from the Old English -mot, which could be appended to the end of a word, as in “Texmoot.” It was made famous by the “Entmoots” of the tree-shepherding Ents in J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings.